You’ve Reached Sam by Dustin Thao book review

You’ve Reached Sam by Dustin Thao book review

If I Stay meets Your Name in this heartfelt novel about love, loss, and what it means to say goodbye.

Seventeen-year-old Julie has her future all planned out—move out of her small town with her boyfriend Sam, attend college in the city, spend a summer in Japan. But then Sam dies. And everything changes.

Heartbroken, Julie skips his funeral, throws out his things, and tries everything to forget him and the tragic way he died. But a message Sam left behind in her yearbook forces back memories. Desperate to hear his voice one more time, Julie calls Sam’s cellphone just to listen to his voicemail.

And Sam picks up the phone.

In a miraculous turn of events, Julie’s been given a second chance at goodbye. The connection is temporary. But hearing Sam’s voice makes her fall for him all over again, and with each call it becomes harder to let him go. However, keeping her otherworldly calls with Sam a secret isn’t easy, especially when Julie witnesses the suffering Sam’s family is going through. Unable to stand by the sidelines and watch their shared loved ones in pain, Julie is torn between spilling the truth about her calls with Sam and risking their connection and losing him forever. 

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My Review

DNF (Did not finish reading). The story had a lot of potential but it honestly wasn’t going anywhere. There was no point or goal to the story at all. The whole story is about the MC talking to her dead boyfriend while she just went on with her daily life 🤷🏻‍♀️. I don’t usually DNF books but what made me do it was (if you are interested in content read “spoiler” which really isn’t that of a spoiler anyway) 

.spoiler below! You’ve been warned :s

….that a character was homosexual. I was getting red flags from the beginning when the “dead boyfriend’s” guy best friend started acting wierd with the dead guy’s girlfriend, saying how she smelled like him when she wore one of his shirts and then proceeding to act all eek. And then him telling her how she hated her for so long because she stole him from him 🙄….. pls note the “dead boyfriend” was straight so….

Also, there are a couple of swear words throught the book and a lot of instances God’s name is taken in vain.

Yeah, kinda sucks because it sounded amazing and that cover is gorgeous but oh well.

I’m sure I shall find some other amazing books to share with you all soon 😊❤️

*I recieved a free copy of the book from the publisher and all of the beforementioned thoughts are my own and weren’t influnced by the author or publisher*

About the Author

Dustin Thao is a Vietnamese American writer based in Chicago. He graduated from Amherst College with a B.A. in Political Science, and is currently in a PhD program at Northwestern University. He writes contemporary fiction, and his debut novel You’ve Reached Sam will be published November 2021 with Wednesday Books.

Dearest Josephine by Caroline George book review

Dearest Josephine by Caroline George book review

”You are going to roll down this hill with me, Elias Welby. And if we die, then…at least we died laughing.”

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Review

I can’t put to words what this book did to me. It stabbed my heart, mended it, and then stabbed it again, mercilessly. That’s the only way to describe it. The book blurb of Dearest Josephine doesn’t even begin to do justice to the story at all. But, really, does any book blurb do justice to rare unicorns like this? I don’t think so. *wipes tear*

How to even describe this book? Magical. The way Caroline weaves this story is incredible, incredible, incredible. The book is told with letters, texts, emails and even a ‘‘novel’’ within the book. It’s the most ingenious book I’ve ever read.

First things first, the characters.

For me, sometimes it’s a little hard to relate to historical fiction characters, it requires a lot of skill to make them relatable and believable. Some authors tend to go a little too far with etiquette and all the classy things of the time, that they forget to show us the human side of characters leaving us with nice but non relatable ones.

Well, this is not the case. Even though Caroline’s characters were everything they should be in terms of society and expectations, there was a raw and human side to them I can’t explain. They were not just there; they were alive. They craved for the same things we now crave; they were quirky and honest and true to themselves. They built forts and drank hot chocolate; they rolled down hills and ate snowflakes. They were young people fighting to be who they truly were while dancing to society’s expectations and rules. Guys in this book cried, laughed, were silly boys and some days mature adults. They had their highs and lows, and I loved that so much. The book depicts the war raging inside young people’s hearts and how they deal with it, for better or for worse.

I won’t even begin talking about Caroline’s writing style and voice because I won’t stop ranting and this review will get too long. Reading Dearest Josephine felt like snowflakes and sunshine, summer storms and cozy fires, roses and thorns-an eclipse of bittersweet goodness.

I’ll just say, Caroline, you have become one of my fav authors and Dearest Josephine is so far my favorite read of 2021 <3

My rating: ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ 5/5

Content:

-The word bas*ard is used throughout the book

-There is casual drinking (not glorified)

-Quick mention of a character having committed adultery in the past (nothing descriptive)

-Kissing (non descriptive)

Book blurb:

2021: Chocolate and Earl Grey tea can’t fix Josie De Clare’s horrible year. She mourned the death of her father and suffered a teen-life crisis, which delayed her university plans. But when her father’s will reveals a family-owned property in Northern England, Josie leaves London to find clarity at the secluded manor house. While exploring the estate, she discovers two-hundred-year-old love letters written by an elusive novelist, all addressed to someone named Josephine. And then she discovers a novel in which it seems like she’s the heroine…

1821: Novelist Elias Roch loves a woman he can never be with. Born the bastard son to a nobleman and cast out from society, Elias seeks refuge in his mind with the quirky heroine who draws him into a fantasy world of scandal, betrayal, and unconditional love. Convinced she’s his soulmate, Elias writes letters to her, all of which divulge the tragedy and trials of his personal life.

As fiction blurs into reality, Josie and Elias must decide: How does one live if love can’t wait? Separated by two hundred years, they fight against time to find each other in a story of her, him, and the novel written by the man who loves her.

About the Author

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Caroline George is the multi-award-winning author of Dearest Josephine, The Summer We Forgot, and other YA fiction titles. Her first book released when she was fifteen years old, a feat which led to more publications and internships with HarperCollins and Hillsong in Sydney, Australia. She graduated from Belmont University with a degree in publishing and public relations, and now travels the country, speaking at conferences and writing full-time.

A Georgia native, Caroline aspires to one day host The Great British Baking Show and delights in being best known for writing the phrase, “Coffee first. Save the world later.” When she’s not glued to her laptop, she can be found hiking in the Appalachian Mountains, sipping a lavender latte, or chatting with young writers. Find her on Instagram @authorcarolinegeorge and Twitter @CarolineGeorge_

Set the Stars Alight by Amanda Dykes book review

Set the Stars Alight by Amanda Dykes book review

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Oh my goodness, 😭❤️ This book has touched my heart in such a way…I have no words.

Amanda, if you ever read this, I just want to say THANK YOU. Thank you for writing such a beautiful story of hope and light.

I don’t even know where to Read more