A Tapestry of Light by Kimberly Duffy book review + giveaway

A Tapestry of Light by Kimberly Duffy book review + giveaway

About the Book

Book:  A Tapestry of Light

Author: Kimberly Duffy

Genre: Christian Historical Romance

Release date: March 16, 2021

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Calcutta, 1886.

Ottilie Russell is adrift between two cultures, British and Indian, belonging to both and neither. In order to support her little brother, Thaddeus, and her grandmother, she relies upon her skills in beetle-wing embroidery that have been passed down to her through generations of Indian women.

When a stranger appears with the news that Thaddeus is now Baron Sunderson and must travel to England to take his place as a nobleman, Ottilie is shattered by the secrets that come to light. Despite her growing friendship with Everett Scott, friend to Ottilie’s English grandmother and aunt, she refuses to give up her brother. Then tragedy strikes, and she is forced to make a decision that will take Thaddeus far from death and herself far from home.

But betrayal and loss lurk in England, too, and soon Ottilie must fight to ensure Thaddeus doesn’t forget who he is, as well as find a way to stitch a place for herself in this foreign land.

Click here to get your copy!

My Review ✨

The thing I love most about Kimberley’s writing is the depth it has- the amount of layers and complexity of the characters and story. Her subplots are SUPERB and she weaves them with her main story with such skill, I’m amazed- truly amazed.💛
A Tapestry of Light feels alive- I could smell the wonderful pastries and cardamom 🥮, touch the shiny beetle elytra glimmering under the sun , feel the elaborate dresses embroidered with rainbow colors 🌈 , actually see the clash of two different cultures and people mingling together in this other world city…. I was sucked in the story in such a way, I didn’t want it to end. I grabbed this book at night, right before bed and it just filled me with such a cozy feeling ahhh.
I adore the family trope in this books so much! It will make your heart smile :)
The main character, Ottilie is such a beautiful soul. Even though she had her struggles and doubts, she stood up for her family and worked diligently to fill, at her young age, that parental role for her younger brother, Thaddeus. She’s so strong in so many ways…She’s the perfect example of a strong girl with a gentle spirit. 
All the characters are adorable and complement each other beautifully. 
A Tapestry of Light is a cacophony of truth and light in a world as colorful as the stories of these beautiful characters. 
I loved it and highly recommend it!

About the Author

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Kimberly Duffy is a Long Island native currently living in Southwest Ohio, via six months in India. When she’s not homeschooling her four kids, she writes historical fiction that takes her readers back in time and across oceans. She loves trips that require a passport, recipe books, and practicing kissing scenes with her husband of twenty years. He doesn’t mind.

More from Kimberly

When I set out to write a new novel, I plan the entire thing from start to finish. I write down each scene on an index card and know exactly what’s going to happen when I sit down for the day’s work. I’m meticulous that way.

But I never plan my characters’ spiritual arcs. Because I want their faith journey to be organic to the story. I want it to feel authentic. It’s such an important part of each of my books and I recognize that some things just refuse plotting and need to develop in a more natural way.

My debut novel, A Mosaic of Wings, features a heroine steeped in science. Nora loves the natural world and so her faith was encouraged by studying the wings of a butterfly or examining an interesting plant. She’s not particularly sentimental or emotive so the faith element of that story had to be presented in a way that made sense for her. Nora’s faith arc is subtle.

Not so for A Tapestry of Light. I had no intention of writing a book that delved into my own struggle with doubt. But that’s what Ottilie required. And it wrung me dry.

Then built me back up.

My faith story is a twisted kind of one. Raised a Christian, I went into ministry, firmly attached myself to the faith of my childhood, and thought it would never waver.

I was wrong.

Oh, how it wavered. For whatever reason, when I hit about 30, it seemed everything I had always believed no longer made sense. It was devastating. Terrifying. And it broke me.

But brokenness is its own sort of beauty and when you recognize there is no way for you to pick up the pieces yourself, God can come in and fill those cracks and shattered places.

Those five years of doubt and questioning and facing the reality that even though I’d always loved Christ, I didn’t really know Him (and didn’t really know why I believed in Him), were some of the most painful I’ve experienced. But I believe with every bit of my being that God is in the business of redemption. Of restoration. Of filling up so that we can pour out.

And he took my own very personal struggle and helped me turn it into a story that, I hope and pray, might encourage others. I gave Ottilie my questions. I gave her my doubt. I gave her my fear and desperation and, in the end, I gave her my hope.

There’s a little piece of me in each of my books, but this one contains my heart.

Blog Stops

Life of Literature, March 27

Through the Fire Blogs, March 27

Debbie’s Dusty Deliberations, March 27

Texas Book-aholic, March 28

Breny and Books, March 28

By The Book, March 29

Genesis 5020, March 29

Inklings and notions, March 29

Musings of a Sassy Bookish Mama, March 30

Mypreciousbitsandmusings, March 30

A Modern Day Fairy Tale, March 31

Mia Reads, March 31

Reflections from my bookshelves, March 31

Connie’s History Classroom, April 1

Remembrancy, April 1

For Him and My Family, April 2

Rachael’s Inkwell, April 2

Vicky Sluiter, April 2

deb’s Book Review, April 3

Batya’s Bits, April 3

Locks, Hooks and Books, April 4

Godly Book Reviews, April 4

Pause for Tales, April 4

Truth and Grace Homeschool Academy, April 5

Simple Harvest Reads, April 5 (Guest Review from Mindy Houng)

Ashley’s Clean Book Reviews, April 6

A Baker’s Perspective, April 6

Labor Not in Vain, April 6

She Lives To Read, April 7

Betti Mace, April 7

Happily Managing a Household of Boys, April 8

To Everything There Is A Season, April 8

Mary Hake, April 8

Wishful Endings, April 9

Bigreadersite, April 9

Giveaway

To celebrate her tour, Kimberly is giving away the grand prize $25 Amazon gift card along with a signed copy of either A Mosaic of Wings or A Tapestry of Light!!

Be sure to comment on the blog stops for nine extra entries into the giveaway! Click the link below to enter.

https://promosimple.com/ps/109d5/a-tapestry-of-light-celebration-tour-giveaway

Dearest Josephine by Caroline George book review

Dearest Josephine by Caroline George book review

”You are going to roll down this hill with me, Elias Welby. And if we die, then…at least we died laughing.”

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Review

I can’t put to words what this book did to me. It stabbed my heart, mended it, and then stabbed it again, mercilessly. That’s the only way to describe it. The book blurb of Dearest Josephine doesn’t even begin to do justice to the story at all. But, really, does any book blurb do justice to rare unicorns like this? I don’t think so. *wipes tear*

How to even describe this book? Magical. The way Caroline weaves this story is incredible, incredible, incredible. The book is told with letters, texts, emails and even a ‘‘novel’’ within the book. It’s the most ingenious book I’ve ever read.

First things first, the characters.

For me, sometimes it’s a little hard to relate to historical fiction characters, it requires a lot of skill to make them relatable and believable. Some authors tend to go a little too far with etiquette and all the classy things of the time, that they forget to show us the human side of characters leaving us with nice but non relatable ones.

Well, this is not the case. Even though Caroline’s characters were everything they should be in terms of society and expectations, there was a raw and human side to them I can’t explain. They were not just there; they were alive. They craved for the same things we now crave; they were quirky and honest and true to themselves. They built forts and drank hot chocolate; they rolled down hills and ate snowflakes. They were young people fighting to be who they truly were while dancing to society’s expectations and rules. Guys in this book cried, laughed, were silly boys and some days mature adults. They had their highs and lows, and I loved that so much. The book depicts the war raging inside young people’s hearts and how they deal with it, for better or for worse.

I won’t even begin talking about Caroline’s writing style and voice because I won’t stop ranting and this review will get too long. Reading Dearest Josephine felt like snowflakes and sunshine, summer storms and cozy fires, roses and thorns-an eclipse of bittersweet goodness.

I’ll just say, Caroline, you have become one of my fav authors and Dearest Josephine is so far my favorite read of 2021 <3

My rating: ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ 5/5

Content:

-The word bas*ard is used throughout the book

-There is casual drinking (not glorified)

-Quick mention of a character having committed adultery in the past (nothing descriptive)

-Kissing (non descriptive)

Book blurb:

2021: Chocolate and Earl Grey tea can’t fix Josie De Clare’s horrible year. She mourned the death of her father and suffered a teen-life crisis, which delayed her university plans. But when her father’s will reveals a family-owned property in Northern England, Josie leaves London to find clarity at the secluded manor house. While exploring the estate, she discovers two-hundred-year-old love letters written by an elusive novelist, all addressed to someone named Josephine. And then she discovers a novel in which it seems like she’s the heroine…

1821: Novelist Elias Roch loves a woman he can never be with. Born the bastard son to a nobleman and cast out from society, Elias seeks refuge in his mind with the quirky heroine who draws him into a fantasy world of scandal, betrayal, and unconditional love. Convinced she’s his soulmate, Elias writes letters to her, all of which divulge the tragedy and trials of his personal life.

As fiction blurs into reality, Josie and Elias must decide: How does one live if love can’t wait? Separated by two hundred years, they fight against time to find each other in a story of her, him, and the novel written by the man who loves her.

About the Author

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Caroline George is the multi-award-winning author of Dearest Josephine, The Summer We Forgot, and other YA fiction titles. Her first book released when she was fifteen years old, a feat which led to more publications and internships with HarperCollins and Hillsong in Sydney, Australia. She graduated from Belmont University with a degree in publishing and public relations, and now travels the country, speaking at conferences and writing full-time.

A Georgia native, Caroline aspires to one day host The Great British Baking Show and delights in being best known for writing the phrase, “Coffee first. Save the world later.” When she’s not glued to her laptop, she can be found hiking in the Appalachian Mountains, sipping a lavender latte, or chatting with young writers. Find her on Instagram @authorcarolinegeorge and Twitter @CarolineGeorge_